• Addiction in the Classroom: The Rise of Drug Use in Schools
    Among adolescents, rates of drug use have been on the rise in recent years. This is especially true for high school students, where the problem has become increasingly prevalent. While the reasons for this trend are complex, one contributing factor is the pressure that students feel to succeed. The pressure to perform well in school can lead students to turn to drugs as a way to cope with stress and anxiety. The consequences of this trend are serious. Drug use can lead to academic problems, health issues, and even addiction. It is therefore crucial that schools take measures to address the issue of addiction in the classroom. By providing resources and support for students, we can help reduce the rates of drug use and help ensure that our students are healthy and successful. As drug use becomes more prevalent in society, it is also becoming more common in schools. This is a cause for concern for many parents, teachers, and school administrators. There are a number of reasons why drugs may be more prevalent in schools, and it is important to be aware of these reasons in order to address the problem. One reason why drugs may be more prevalent in schools is that they are more accessible to teenagers. With the internet, teenagers can easily order drugs online or find sources for illegal drugs in their community. Social media can also be a source of information about where to find drugs. Another reason for the increase in drug use in schools is the pressure that teens are under. They may feel pressure to use drugs in order to fit in with their peers or to cope with the stress of school. Additionally, some teens may turn to drugs as a way to self-medicate if they are dealing with mental health issues. There are a number of ways to address the problem of drug use in schools. One is to provide more education about the risks of drug use. This can be done through classroom presentations, assemblies, and parent-teacher meetings. It is also important to have a policy in place that clearly states the consequences for students who are caught using drugs. Schools should also work to create a positive and supportive environment. This can be done by fostering relationships between students and teachers and promoting extracurricular activities that provide a sense of community. The rise of drug use in schools is a cause for concern. However, there are steps that can be taken to address the problem. By providing education about the risks of drug use and creating a positive and supportive school environment, we can help prevent teenagers from turning to drugs.
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    Created by Leilani Floyd Picture
  • Innocent Orlando Brown Found Guilty
    As a minority so called blacks deal with injustice everyday. Being that so called blacks are in poverty leads to them not being financially able to afford an attorney. Therefore, several so called black men are thrown away in the prison system while being innocent. There's power in numbers and if we stand up and fight through the injustice done to the minority groups change will be made. Mr Brown has children and if he isn't exonerated his children will grow up without a father. Please help bring Mr Brown home to his children.
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    Created by Nadia Winston
  • United Diaspora To Keep Commissioner Wale Adelagunja - DACAC
    1. Diversity of thought leadership is needed for the progress of our communities. 2. Commissioner Wale has been very resourceful to the community and his contribution towards the growth in DE & beyond is needed. 3. This violates the vision and mission of DACAC and is against the culture that the African Diaspora is trying to promote in a united front. 4. Bullying tactics will not be tolerated in the State of Delaware. 5. The community was not aware and was not notified about the attempts of his removal. 6. Commissioner Wale was one of the original founders in the attempt to unite and build the people.
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    Created by Mela Cook
  • Land Sovereignty for Blaine Elementary School Garden
    Educational, green spaces like The Strawberry Mansion-Blaine Elementary Environmental Center provide food, gathering, education, and social advocacy support community healing and encourage youth engagement. The environmental provides vital science, math, technology, art, and engineering education through an agricultural lens. Blaine students deserve access to environmental spaces that enhance their everyday learning and provide new avenues for study.
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    Created by Lavinia Soliman
  • Stop expansion of the petrochemical industry
    For decades, the petrochemical industry has been an environmental and public health concern for communities in Texas, Louisiana and the Ohio River Valley, where many of these facilities are located. But the industry's expansion brings those concerns to the backyards of millions of Americans. After the most recent freight train derailment in East Palestine, Ohio, officials are still releasing lists of carcinogenic chemicals that have tainted the community's air, making it difficult to breathe. Chemicals from the derailment have spilled into the Ohio River, affecting the water supply for 25 million people in the region. From the discovery of toxic chemicals in St. James Parish, Louisiana, to the cancer cluster discovered in Houston’s Fifth Ward, we’ve seen what happens when the government allows private corporations in the petrochemical industry to operate unchecked for the sake of profit. Time and time again, the EPA’s refusal to regulate this industry — or to place sanctions on the corporations that operate negligently — has led to countless ecological disasters, which often take their greatest toll on the health of Black and low-income communities. These communities then are left with few resources or recourse once their homes suddenly are made dangerous and unlivable, and even fewer options once the news cameras leave. That’s why we know that the lack of regulation that allowed a corporation to endanger the health of East Palestine’s residents is the same lack of regulation that will continue to lead to the loss of countless lives in vulnerable communities across the nation if we do not take action. We must make a commitment to halt the unnecessary expansion of the petrochemical industry now. The communities affected by the Norfolk Southern derailment deserve answers and accountability. No one from the petrochemical industry showed up at a recent town hall to address these community concerns in East Palestine, Ohio. And it remains unclear which corporation is responsible for the chemicals being transported by Norfolk Southern, the rail company responsible for the derailment. Residents hope to get some answers when environmental activist Erin Brockovich and civil litigator Mikal C. Watts address a town hall on Friday, Feb. 24, at East Palestine High School. We must stop the expansion of this industry and move beyond petrochemicals. Sign this petition and join our movement today.
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    Created by Hip Hop Caucus
  • Jackson is NOT for the Taking!
    A People United Will Never Be Defeated! Democracy belongs to the people. All of the people. As history has taught us, what happens in Mississippi has the power to influence what happens everywhere else in the world. This petition has been created to serve as the rallying cry of the people of Jackson and the greater Hinds County area. Hinds County is Mississippi’s most populous county, and Jackson is the state’s largest and most populous city. Both Hinds County and Jackson are majority Black and led by Black majorities. Should it be enacted into law, HB 1020 would: ●Require more than 18% of Jackson’s normal allocation of sales tax revenue be given to the Capitol Complex Improvement District, or CCID. ●Enlarge the CCID area and thrust it deep into the purely residential area of Northeast Jackson, miles from downtown, where the Capitol Police —who have shot or killed several Black people recently — have no right or reason to be. ●Strip from duly-elected judges in Hinds County the right to preside over ANY cases brought against the State of Mississippi and the CCID. Only judges appointed by Mississippi’s white chief justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court will have the power to hear and make decisions on cases against the Capitol Police (CCID police), the State of Mississippi and its agencies. ●Strip Hinds County residents of their right: ○ to have civil and criminal cases adjudged by their duly-elected Hinds County judges, the majority of whom are Black. ○ to be prosecuted according to the prosecutorial decisions of their duly-elected district attorney, who is Black. ●Replace the political voice and electoral power of hundreds of thousands of Hinds County residents, 70% of whom are Black, and give this voting and decision- making power to three white state-level officials. What is happening in Jackson, Mississippi, is ruthless. It is racist. It is dangerously anti-democratic. And it must stop!
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    Created by Jackson Undivided Coalition Picture
  • Tell Corporations to Divest from Cop City!
    Black communities will be especially harmed by the police expansion and militarization that Cop City represents . Studies have shown that police with more military equipment kill more civilians, prevent less crime, and make residents feel less safe., The fake urban village APF seeks to create will train officers to view Atlanta like a warzone and treat civilians like potential enemy combatants. Let’s not mince words: The Atlanta Police Foundation has a history of using corporate donations to fund the expansion of the police at the expense of the Black community in Atlanta. Universities are key funders for Cop City despite their public commitments towards racial justice. Emory, GSU, and Georgia Tech must pick a side. They cannot stand with us if they continue to fund Cop City. Clearly, Cop City is another attempt to bolster the AFT’s influence, militarize the police and increase their control over Black Atlantans. In 2020, dozens of Atlanta police officers staged a “sick-out” after prosecutors filed charges against their colleagues for killing Rayshard Brooks, a Black man who simply fell asleep in his vehicle. The APF awarded the Atlanta officers who stayed off the job with a $500 bonus even as advocates demanded justice for Brooks. At the same time, the APF has helped Atlanta become one of the most surveilled cities in the country: It helped pay for the network of 11,000 surveillance cameras stationed across the city. . Cop City also puts the environmental health of these same Black communities at risk. The South River is the fourth most endangered river in America. The chemical runoff from weapons testing at the militarized police facility will further pollute the South River and the surrounding communities.
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    Created by Kamau Franklin
  • Demand the Florida State Board of Ed Allow African American Studies to Be Taught in High School!
    On January 18th, Florida Governor Ron DeSantis rejected the College Board’s request to approve an AP African American Studies (AAPS) course, baselessly claiming that it “significantly lacks educational value.” A first-of-its-kind pilot program, AP African American Studies would empower students with extensive knowledge about the contributions and lived experiences of Black people in this country. Lessons would range from those uplifting our legacy in literature and the arts to lessons about how our activism has shaped this country’s laws, institutions, and democracy. Not only does AP African American Studies put Black history front and center, but it also creates pathways for Black students to build stronger college applications and even earn university credit. But before the College Board piloted AP African American Studies, public school curriculums and educational materials had always fallen short. Back in 2021, a Lousiana textbook came under fire after omitting the Black perspective when discussing the Civil War, from sympathizing with white slave owners who could no longer exploit Black people after emancipation to downplaying the brutality of the Civil War and the events that incited it. And following the May 2020 slaying of George Floyd, Black educators and students shared concerns that “the humanity of Blackness” was missing from history classes, from failing to cover communities of free people in Africa who pioneered modern mathematics to minimizing the brutalities that Black people experienced following the civil war (e.g., lynching). However, the College Board saw a gap in the education system at large and did something about it; that’s why the AP African American Studies course is invaluable. Over the past few years, Gov. DeSantis and the state of Florida have led the charge in the national erasure of Black history and culture. In April 2022, Gov. DeSantis signed the “Stop Woke Act” into law, which restricts lessons on Black and LGBTQ+ history; and from July 2021 through June 2022, Florida banned between 500 and 750 books, the second-highest of any state. Now, it wants to rob Black students of the chance to finally see their histories and culture take center stage in an AP course curriculum. It’s clear that Fl. Gov. DeSantis has been using Black students as political pawns in his quest to build power and conservative outrage, and the Florida State Board of Education (SBE) has long enabled him. Sign the petition to demand that the Florida State Board of Education put an end to Gov. DeSantis’ attacks on Black history and act in the best interest of Florida public school students!
    44,615 of 45,000 Signatures
    Created by Brianna Beadle
  • Stop Enabling DeSantis & Let AP African American Studies Be Taught in Schools!
    On January 18th, Fl. Governor Ron DeSantis rejected the College Board’s request to approve an AP African American Studies (AAPS) course, baselessly claiming that it “significantly lacks educational value.” A first-of-its-kind pilot program, AP African American Studies would empower students with extensive knowledge about the contributions and lived experiences of Black people in this country. Lessons would range from those uplifting our legacy in literature and the arts to lessons about how our activism has shaped this country’s laws, institutions, and democracy. Not only does AP African American Studies put Black history front and center, but it also creates pathways for Black students to build stronger college applications and even earn university credit. But before the College Board piloted AP African American Studies, public school curriculums and educational materials had always fallen short. Back in 2021, a Lousiana textbook came under fire after omitting the Black perspective when discussing the Civil War, from sympathizing with white slave owners who could no longer exploit Black people after emancipation to downplaying the brutality of the Civil War and the events that incited it. And following the May 2022 slaying of George Floyd, Black educators and students shared concerns that “the humanity of Blackness” was missing from history classes, from failing to cover communities of free people in Africa who pioneered modern mathematics to minimizing the brutalities that Black people experienced following the civil war (e.g., lynching). However, the College Board saw a gap in the education system at large and did something about it; that’s why the AP African American Studies course is invaluable. Over the past few years, Gov. DeSantis and the state of Florida have led the charge in the national erasure of Black history and culture. In April 2022, Gov. DeSantis signed the “Stop Woke Act” into law, which restricts lessons on Black and LGBTQ+ history; and from July 2021 through June 2022, Florida banned between 500 and 750 books, the second-highest of any state. Now, it wants to rob Black students of the chance to finally see their histories and culture take center stage in an AP course curriculum. It’s clear that Fl. Gov. DeSantis has been using Black students as political pawns in his quest to build power and conservative outrage, and the Florida State Board of Education (SBE) has long enabled him. Sign the petition to demand that Chairman Gary Chartrand and the Fl. SBE put an end to Gov. DeSantis’ attacks on Black history and act in the best interest of Florida public school students!
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    Created by Brianna Beadle
  • TELL THE ATLANTA CITY COUNCIL END COLLATERAL CONSEQUENCES FOR A FAIR SHOT AT A SECOND CHANCE
    As a justice-impacted person, I know from personal experience — and from the stories of friends and peers — how felony convictions impact our daily lives. It is very hard to reestablish yourself financially after jail or prison and to overcome society’s resistance to returning citizens. I live in Georgia, a state that allows private employers to learn about our incarceration history yet rarely gives us a chance to talk about who we really are as disenfranchised people before rejecting our job applications. We rarely are given a second chance. Many laws prevent people with felony convictions from getting accounting, banking, nursing and real estate licenses. Even when we get a job, we have been denied advancement within the company because of stigma. We deserve second chances. Black women have a higher rate of unemployment and homelessness than any other demographic group of formerly incarcerated people. Their children also are systematically restricted and excluded like their justice-impacted parents. In addition to being denied professional licenses, we also are unable to get driver’s licenses in some localities. We also are denied the right to be a parent or to be a caretaker for disabled children and elderly parents. Last October, Atlanta's City Council took a step to ensure the most vulnerable citizens are protected under city ordinance. But Atlanta's City Council has the power to take the next step toward an equitable Atlanta by updating the city's Bill of Rights to include justice-impacted people as a protected class and ultimately improve the lives of more than 44,000 people. We've served our time. Help us give justice-impacted people a second chance in Atlanta. Sign this petition and tell Atlanta’s City Council to pave the way for our second chances without suffering the discriminatory effects of collateral consequences.
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    Created by Barred Business
  • FIRE WSSU Associate Professor, Cynthia Jan Villagomez
    HBCUs across the United States are known to have a warm and welcoming culture. The campus environment is supportive and provides a voice and platform to allow students to grow into leaders in their fields. Cynthia chose to weaponize the campus police in an environment that would otherwise be insulated from the traumas that Black Americans experience routinely. This space needs to be protected and her actions cannot go unchecked.
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    Created by Vick Allen
  • Support the Creation of a Statue of the Honorable Marcus Garvey at the African Union HQ
    The Honorable Marcus Garvey is considered to be one of the major pillars of the Pan-Africa movement as he laid a foundation of African Philosophy and organized the largest global organization of African peoples. Read our Medium Article Here Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association and African Communities League had over 6 million members in 1926, with over 1000 branches in 42 countries in Africa and the Americas. Headquartered in Harlem, New York, the Organization had hundreds of properties and businesses while simultaneously engaging in the local, national and international political and social struggles of African people. His comprehensive vision and work inspired others that came after him. Malcolm X’s parents were active members of Garvey’s organization and he influenced many African leaders such as Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana and Jomo Kenyatta of Kenya. Because of his influence, his activities were carefully scrutinized and the Organization was infiltrated and targeted for destruction by J. Edgar Hoover of the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the United States government. Garvey was fraudulently charged, convicted and spent 3 years in Federal Penitentiary due to perjured testimony, an empty envelope as the only evidence and a politically prejudiced court and District Attorney. This travesty of justice and violation of Garvey’s rights under U.S. law has brought about a continued and consistent call for Garvey’s exoneration and posthumous pardon.
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    Created by Miles Henderson