• Stop Using Voter Attendance to Purge Voter Registration #LetGAVOTE
    How and when a person votes is a personal decision and is their right to exercise how and when they choose. As an activist I've worked with grassroots organizations to register voters and increase voter turn out. In order to increase voter turn out, it is important to understand why registered voters aren't voting. After simply asking this question to several citizens, it is clear that some people choose not to vote because candidates aren't speaking to issues they feel are important. That is their choice and their right! The right to vote is granted to citizens by the Constitution of the United States. It should not be taken away, suspended, or revoked because the Secretary of State has determined that a citizen does not vote enough. When the Secretary of State decides to purge voter registrations, the responsibility to remedy the problem is placed upon the citizens. The citizens often don't know a problem exists until they go to vote and are denied their right, which ultimately leads to voter suppression. This practice speaks to a broader discriminatory history within the country of using a person's past to discriminate and oppress. Federal law does require voter rolls to be maintained for accuracy. However, other states have found more equitable ways to do this without disenfranchising specific populations. Please share and sign this petition to let Brad Raffensperger, GA Secretary of State, know that we need to end the practice of using past voter participation to clean up voter rolls. If one citizen is denied their constitutional right to vote, that is one too many.
    134 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Keisha Brown Picture
  • Ask about #metoo!
    #AskaboutMeToo at the November 20th debates in Atlanta. Two years ago, we raised our voices in the name of courage and accountability. 19 million of us showed up for ourselves and showed up for each other, and we’re not turning back. We believe that healing is a form of action, and taking action helps us to heal. Two years later we continue to call on political leaders to demonstrate their commitment to survivors by putting forth solid policy proposals that will aid in survivor’s healing, provide necessary services and benefits, and expand the laws to ensure that they cover all survivors- no matter what kind of sexual violence they have experienced, where they have experienced it, by who or when. We want to hear candidates address ending sexual violence as an epidemic during the debates. We want all presidential candidates to layout specific plans to address sexual violence, including harassment, and supporting survivors.
    1,437 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by 'me too' MVMT
  • Bring Our Voting Precinct Back
    The voting precinct in the Anderson Center, which is located on the campus of Winston-Salem State University, had been a longtime voting site prior to the 2014 election. After the Board of Elections changed to majority republican, the voting site was removed from the University. Since then, Winston-Salem State has had a continuous population increase. Freshman aren't allowed to park on campus and construction on the highway has permanently closed the interchanges with Diggs Boulevard and Vargrave Drive. This forces residents and students to take a longer route to go vote. The nearest precinct is now the Sims community center, which is on the west side of the highway. Many students do not have access to transportation to go vote. How do our representatives and the Board of Elections expect us as young black students to participate in our democracy, if there is not a polling site that is accessible to all students on the campus of Winston-Salem State University? We deserve the right to have our voices heard!
    158 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Martina Clay Picture
  • #LetAggiesVote: Stop Erasing Aggie Voices
    Six states, one territory, six relocations and an adolescence filled with diverse experiences have all led me here, North Carolina A&T State University. I’ve come here to major in political science in search for answers to questions I did not know how to ask as a child. Why did I walk one way to get home from school but all my black friends would walk the other way when I lived in New Jersey? Why were my white classmates and teachers in Kansas filled with such hate and anger during the 2016 election? Why did I witness two elections in which my parents' vote, along with the popular vote, was ignored? I went running for answers. While I found some of the answers I was looking for in the classroom, the root of the problem stemmed from the place I wish to soon call home. NC A&T has a rich history of political activism. On February 1st 1960, four brave young aggies fought to have a seat at the lunch counter to ensure that the voices and concerns of their community would be heard. These sit ins were not just about having a seat where others sat but having their voices heard equally along with their counterparts. They had the understanding that if you’re not at the table, you're on the menu. Today we are asking you to give us a better chance to be heard during these turbulent times in America. Being disenfranchised, silenced, and ostracized is not a new phenomenon for our majority minority students. However, simply because it has become the norm, does not mean we will allow this disenfranchisement to continue any longer. A&T has been the subject of controversial partisan gerrymandering in recent years, but shifting voting ID laws and the loss of its early voting location have made it increasingly difficult for the school’s nearly 12,000 students to participate fairly in the democratic process. To top it off, the primaries are being held during our spring break. Not allowing us to have an early voting site on campus, with election day during spring break, would discourage students from voting. This is in spite of the fact that civic engagement on campus is growing; from 2014 to 2018 A&T voter turnout increased by 51% in the midterms. This trend would continue if there were not so many efforts to suppress our vote. By allowing us to have an early voting precinct on campus you allow us to play a part in this democracy that we have historically been kept from doing. A democracy works best when everyone has a voice and can speak on issues that affect their everyday lives. By putting an early voting site on NC A&T’s campus, you are telling me and 12,000 students that our voice matters in these supposedly fair and free elections. You are telling us whether we come from in state, or out of state, that Greensboro, NC is our home for the next four or more years of our lives. This would establish that when we are in Guilford County, we are at home where we will always have a spot at the table and we will never be silenced.
    2,133 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Cole Riley
  • Calling for the Removal/Resignation of sitting U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith of Mississippi
    Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith's comments on November 2nd, 2018, regarding her willingness to sit “on the front row” at a “public hanging” if invited are not only deeply offensive, they provide further evidence of her blatant disregard for her oath to uphold the Constitution. Senator Hyde-Smith’s failure to stand up to the injustice of hanging deaths in the past and her approval of such violence presently, should bar her from serving as a U.S. Senator or in any government position in the state of Mississippi. She has refused to acknowledge the insensitive and deeply offensive nature of her remarks. A leader who cannot thoughtfully reflect on her actions and their potential harm is unfit to lead.
    11,240 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by #MississippiMatters - Concerned Citizens & Friends of Mississippi Picture
  • Keep Your Promises to Black Voters!
    The people of New Jersey need your help. In 2017, 94 Percent of Black voters cast their ballots for Governor Murphy. Without this support from the Black community, it is unlikely that Phil Murphy would be New Jersey’s governor—53 percent of white voters supported his opponent. But nine months into his administration, Governor Murphy has not focused on critical issues facing the 94 percent: 1) Transforming New Jersey’s youth justice system: New Jersey has a shameful system of youth incarceration in which a Black child is 30 times more likely to be incarcerated than a white child—the highest disparity in the nation. 2) Restoring the right to vote to people with criminal convictions: New Jersey denies the right to vote to nearly 100,000 people who are in prison, on parole, or on probation. Although Black people make up 15 percent of New Jersey's total population, Black residents represent over 60 percent of the people who lost the right to vote due to a criminal conviction. 3) Closing the racial wealth gap: In New Jersey, one of the wealthiest states in America, the median net worth for New Jersey’s white families is $271,402—the highest in the nation. But the median net worth for New Jersey’s Black families is just $5,900. We must ensure that Governor Murphy keeps his promises to the Black voters that put him in office.
    1,613 of 2,000 Signatures
  • Extend Florida Voter Registration till After the Hurricane
    Florida Secretary of State Kent Detzner is playing politics while the people of Florida need to make sure they are safe. No one in the state of Florida should be forced between preparing for the storm and being able to vote in November. Instead of announcing confusing policies and half-measures demand that Secretary of State Detzner extends the voter registration deadline for everyone in Florida. Hurricane Michael is the strongest storm to make landfall in Florida in 13 years. But, a hurricane shouldn't also wipe us out of the democratic process. Folks in Florida already navigate an election system deliberately designed to discourage their participation. Now, the state of Florida is forcing Black folks and other potential voters to choose between their personal safety and their right to vote. By choosing to not extend the voter registration deadline for all Floridians, the Secretary of State excludes eligible residents from the normal number of days they should have had to register if it weren't for the unusual and unpredictable hurricane weather. This means the state of Florida is forcing Black folks and other potential voters to choose between their personal safety and our right to vote. Don’t let voter disenfranchisement be yet another hurdle faced by Florida residents post-Hurricane Michael. By signing our petition you are going to tell Florida Secretary of State Kent Detzner that the state of Florida and the rest of the nation are watching and will not allow him to play politics with people's lives. Officials like Detzner depend on anonymity, and bluster from people like Trump to hide their role in keeping Black voters away from the polls. Tell Detzner that this storm shouldn't deny Black people their freedom to vote. Demand Secretary of State Detzner to extend voter registration until October 16th so that Floridians hit by the storm aren’t also wiped out of the democratic process. The time Floridians had to register to vote was cut short by this hurricane. Sign now and demand voters be given a fair amount of time to register.
    12,104 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Moné Holder Picture
  • Reinstate Bishop Talbert Swan
    Bishop Swan was a strong voice of resistance against racism, white supremacy, and in justice. He was an uncompromising in challenging hypocrisy and advocating for the most vulnerable. Twitter suspended his account without notice because of the complaints of right wing racist and Trump supporting bots and trolls would choose to him of racism for his candid condemnation of bigotry. Bishop Swan had over 70,000 followers and was a leading voice of the resistance. He had a verified account and was an influencer on the social media platform.
    214 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Bishop Talbert Swan Picture
  • Tell Amazon & Apple: Reject Racism and Say No to North Carolina’s Racist Attacks on Voting Rights
    Apple says, “The best way the world works is everybody in. Nobody out.” And Amazon says, “It’s not only that diversity and inclusion are good for our business. It’s more fundamental than that — it’s simply right.” But if they’re willing to move their headquarters to a state that makes a habit of discriminating against eligible Black voters, it’s clearly just a talking point. THE NCGA'S VOTER ID OBSESSION IS RACIST. Prior to 2013, North Carolina had been an example of expanding the freedom to vote. Black folks were gaining political power and increased in participation in successive election after elections. But then in 2013 as part of the "monster voter suppression law" passed by the NCGA, voter ID was required, which Black voters were least likely to have – and that's what they're trying to make part of the constitution now. That 2013 law also eliminated the first seven days of early voting - the exact period that it was used most by Black voters. It cut Sunday voting, a "souls to the polls" tradition used by Black churches to get folks to vote. It eliminated out-of-precinct voting, a rule that allowed working Black voters who couldn't get to their home precinct to at least vote in the same county. In 2014, the NC GOP even moved polling locations further away from Black neighborhoods! Making it harder for Black people to vote wasn't an accident, it was intentional. IT'S UNCONSTITUTIONAL. When a U.S. federal court struck down the voter ID law in 2016, it said: "If discriminatorily motivated, such laws are just as abhorrent, and just as unconstitutional, as laws that expressly discriminate on the basis of race...the General Assembly unconstitutionally enacted the photo ID requirement with racially discriminatory intent.” IT'S BAD BUSINESS. Apple and Amazon both articulate a belief that having a diverse set of perspectives on the team ultimately benefits their company’s ability to do business. If they are hoping to attract Black workers at their new HQs, they should pick a state that thinks their Black workforce deserves the right to vote. Millennials and Gen Z workers care about what their employers stand for and want to live in states that reflect the diversity and inclusion they value. THE BOTTOM LINE I want North Carolina to be a home for both of these wonderful companies, and in addition to taking this step, there are many ways both Amazon and Apple can show true commitment to our communities.* One way Amazon and Apple can demonstrate a real commitment to espoused values of diversity is by making it clear that they won’t move their headquarters to a state that is rapidly sliding backward on racial oppression and voting rights. In 2018, we need to demand that major companies stay on the right side of the law - and the right side of history. ABOUT WILLIAM MATTHEWS William Matthews was raised in Raleigh, NC. William is known around the world as a singer - songwriter and popular recording artist. William's passion is artistry and advocacy. He seamlessly blends music, cinematography and political messaging around themes like racism and climate change which have been highlighted by CNN & Yahoo. In his music, documentaries and podcast work on The Liturgists, William has interviewed prominent religious and thought leaders, songwriters, scientists and global political figures. You can check out his body of work at WilliamMatthewsMusic.com or follow him on Twitter at @WilliamMatt22. SOURCES https://www.ca4.uscourts.gov/Opinions/Published/161468.P.pdf https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/15/us/politics/voter-id-laws-supreme-court-north-carolina.html https://www.apple.com/diversity/ https://www.geekwire.com/2016/jeff-bezos-email-reaffirms-amazons-commitment-tolerance-diversity-trump-win/ https://www.fastcompany.com/3046358/millennials-have-a-different-definition-of-diversity-and-inclusion *https://medium.com/@acrecampaigns/amazons-racial-inequality-prime-fe6ba15fe2d5
    40,928 of 45,000 Signatures
    Created by William Matthews Picture
  • Stop Children from Dying During Divorce and Custody Proceedings
    A mother who is a veteran had to return home from Iraq and fight the battle for her children. The children were taken from her safe and sustainable home, and 50/50 custody order. The mother was falsely arrested. The charges where dismissed but the ramification lingered. Nine years later the mother and her children have no relationship. The children were forced to live full-time with their abusive father leaving them vulnerable to mental, physical and emotional abuse at critical developmental stages in there lives. The court's decision has traumatized the mother and placed the children in danger. As of September 24, 2018, at least 657 children have been murdered by a parent involved in a divorce, separation, custody, visitation, or child support situation in the U.S. since 2008. Abusive parents are often granted custody or unprotected parenting time by family courts—placing our nation’s children at ongoing risk. Researchers who interviewed judges and court administrators following some of these tragedies found that most believed these were isolated incidents. Needed reforms have not been implemented. Many court-related child homicides occurred after family courts granted dangerous parents access to children over the objections of a protective parent. We recognize that the women's right's movement is still a work in progress. Marginalized women face multiple oppressions, and we can only win freedom by bringing awareness on how they impact one another. The women of color need a national movement to uplift the needs of the most marginalized women and children. As women of color we need to stand for our human rights to parent the children we have in a safe and sustainable community.
    349 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Mother's Standing For Children Picture
  • Veto Bill to Fund Militarization of Florida Schools
    The state of Florida needs change to prevent more tragedies, but it will not come with more children staring down the barrel of a gun. Three weeks ago, 17 students and school staff were murdered at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School and Florida was shaken to its core. The Florida legislature followed Governor Rick Scott's lead in drafting "solutions" that involve filling Florida schools with even more guns. Our state's elected officials have approved a bill that provides funding to arm school staff, including teachers, coaches, librarians and counselors, while dramatically increasing funding for police and high level surveillance security in schools. At Governor Scott's direction, this bill will make Florida schools a lot scarier for students, particularly students of color, across the state. After Columbine, 10,000 school police officers were hired to prevent another mass shooting. Two decades later and more police presence in school has not proven to be an effective solution and has not stopped a single mass shooting. Instead, police in Florida have locked up 1 million children, mostly black children, for routine behavior disruptions, like talking back to a teacher or getting into schoolyard scuffles. The proposed bill allots $400 million to make our schools feel more like prisons when they should feel sanctuaries. This bill will have catastrophic consequences for insurmountable numbers of black, brown and poor youth in Florida. Our representatives have a responsibility to act in a way that keeps all Florida children safe. Tell Governor Rick Scott to veto any bill to allocate resources for more police and guns in schools. Supporters Dream Defenders Power U Center for Social Change Advancement Project National Office Color of Change Florida’s Service Employees International Union (SEIU) 1199 New Florida Majority Miami Worker's Center Alliance for Education Justice National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
    12,634 of 15,000 Signatures
    Created by Advancement Project Picture
  • Support the Secure Elections Act: Paper ballot back-up to preserve valid elections
    Our election process is threatened by our election records not being backed up with paper ballots. Our digital ballots could potentially be hacked leaving our system vulnerable. History has shown us election outcomes coming under question leads to Black voter freedom being attacked and restricted. When Trump distracted from questions about his election he did so by accusing Black communities of voter fraud and launching a commission designed to substantiate his lie and restrict Black people's freedom to vote. The "Secure Elections Act" has been introduced by a bipartisan group of Senators led by Republican Senator James Lankford, and Democratic Senator Kamala Harris. It will provide states with the funding they need to make sure ballots have paper records that can't be hacked and we are able to be audit our elections. With this legislation, we will make sure that our election results are legitimate and Black voters are more secure in their freedom to vote. To ensure the validity of our elections, we need to safeguard the ballot by having paper records for elections. Without this, we will have widespread doubts about the validity of any election we hold, and history has shown that Black voter freedom will be targeted for restriction. As Congressional testimonies have shown the government has done nothing to secure our elections. While we ignore the common sense calls to move to paper ballots states like Arkansas are passing updated voter ID laws. Instead of working to push the lie that we need to Voter ID laws aimed at Black voters, we need to pass legislation aimed at the actual threat to our elections. The Secure Elections Act is the bare minimum we could do if we want to make sure our elections are secure against actual fraud. Donald Trump has done absolutely nothing to make Americans feel more secure about their elections instead he has been pushing a narrative to throw them further in doubt, it is time for the Senate to act. Black people understand the importance of free and fair elections as we are still fighting to have our freedom to vote fully recognized. Tell the Senate to pass the "Secure Elections Act" to safeguard the ballot we are still fighting for.
    34,041 of 35,000 Signatures
    Created by Kathleen Ferris